Literature




Books

Barthlott, Wilhelm; Porembski, Stefan; Seine, Rüdiger; Theisen, Inge (2004): Karnivoren - Biologie und Kultur Fleischfressender Pflanzen. Verlag Eugen Ulmer. 224 Pages. German.
A very good book, which mainly deals with the biology and a little bit with the cultivation of the individual carnivorous plant genera. There are also two chapters about carnivorous mosses and fungi. In my opinion one of the best and most current (general) carnivorous plant books at the time.


Bourke, Greg; Fleischmann, Andreas; Lowrie, Allen; McPherson, Stewart; Nunn, Richard; Robinson, Alastair (2017): Drosera of the World: Volume 1 - Oceania. Redfern Natural History Productions. 528 Pages. English.
This series of books covers all types of Drosera all over the world for the first time and is therefore a must have for every Drosera fan. Volume 1 contains an introduction to the genus, as well as descriptions of Australian and New Zealand species from the following sections: Arachnopus, Arcturia, Coelophylla, Drosera, Ergaleium, Stolonifera, Erythorhiza, Luniferae, Macrantha.


Bourke, Greg; Fleischmann, Andreas; Gibson, Robert; Lowrie, Allen; McPherson, Stewart; Rice, Barry; Nunn, Richard; Robinson, Alastair (2017): Drosera of the World: Volume 2 - Oceania, Asia, Europe, North America. Redfern Natural History Productions. 554 Pages. English.
Volume 2 starts exactly where the first part ended and continues with the descriptions of the oceanic Drosera species of the following sections: Bryastrum, Lasiocephala, Phycopsis, Prolifera, Psychophila, Thelocalyx. The focus is also on sundew species from Asia, Europe and North America.


Bourke, Greg; Nunn, Richard (2012): Australian Carnivorous Plants. Redfern Natural History Productions. 180 Pages. English.
This illustrated book contains beautiful pictures of various carnivorous plants (including Utricularia, Drosera, Byblis, Cephalotus) at their respective natural habitat in Australia. The photos are of very high quality and sometimes go over two pages.


Carow, Thomas (2005): Fleischfressende Pflanzen. Franckh-Kosmos Verlags-GmbH & Co. KG, Stuttgart. 48 Pages. German.
This small book deals only briefly with the most common carnivorous genera. The main part deals with the cultivation of carnivores (windowsill, bog garden and general conditions such as light and temperature). It is primarily a good start for the cultivation of carnivorous plants and especially suitable for beginners.


Carow, Thomas; Fürst, Rudi (1990): Fleischfressende Pflanzen, Artenübersicht - Kultur - Vermehrung. Verlag Thomas Carow, Nüdlingen. 72 Pages. German.
This booklet is similar to "Carnivorous Plants (2005)" (see above), but the chapter on the cultivation of carnivorous plants is somewhat shorter in comparison. In addition, there is a table in the book with all carnivorous plant species known at the time. Just like the other book, it is more suitable for beginners.


Carow, Thomas (2009): Karnivoren - Die Welt der fleischfressenden Pflanzen. Franckh-Kosmos Verlags-GmbH & Co. KG, Stuttgart. 192 Pages. German.
A really nice illustrated book that contains high quality photos of many carnivorous plants and their natural habitats. In addition to the pictures, there is usually smaller texts with very interesting facts about the respective species or plant genus, etc.


Conran, John; Cross, Adam; Kalfas, Nick; Nunn, Richard (2019): Cephalotus - the Albany Pitcher Plant. Redfern Natural History Productions. 142 Pages. English.
This book is all about the Albany pitcher plant (Cephalotus follicularis): In addition to extensive descriptions, this book also contains many beautiful photos and illustrations, as well as photos and information of natural habitats. A must have for every fan of this extraordinary species!


Darwin, Charles (1875): Insectivorous Plants. John Murray, London. 462 Pages. English.
The first real carnivorous plant book. In his book with some woodcuts, Darwin treats various types of carnivores (Utricularia, Drosera, Dionaea etc.) and uses experiments to prove that these plants are really carnivorous (which was a moderate scandal at the time). The book can be purchased in various editions (collectors!) or is freely accessible on the Internet for anyone interested. By the way, a German translation appeared as early as 1876 (see illustration).


Dietz, Christian; Jäger, Alfred; Lenz, Claus-Jürgen; Paul, Carsten (2010): Carnivorous Plants of the Western Cape, South Africa 2009. Eigenverlag. 206 Pages. English.
Another interesting illustrated book with photos of Drosera, Roridula and Utricularia at the natural habitat in South Africa. In addition to pictures of carnivorous plants, the book also contains interesting pictures of other plants, animals and the various places visited.


Fleischmann, Andreas (2012): A Monograph of the Genus Genlisea. Redfern Natural History Productions. 728 Pages. English.
This book is a must have for every Genlisea fan. First, the structure of the plants is described in detail (the traps are particularly detailed!). The following pages (about 400) deal with the individual species and sections. The cultivation of this genus is then discussed on the remaining pages. Overall, photos and drawings are of very high quality.


Fleischmann, Andreas; Gibson, Robert; Gonella, Paulo; McPherson, Stewart; Nunn, Richard; Robinson, Alastair (2017): Drosera of the World: Volume 3 - Latin America ß Africa. Redfern Natural History Productions. 489 Pages. English.
The last volume of this book series deals with the Drosera species from Latin America and Africa. As in the two volumes before, these are described with lots of information and very nice photos. This volume also contains a separate section with botanical illustrations, as well as a glossary, information about the authors, etc.


Lowrie, Allen (1987): Carnivorous Plants of Australia, Volume 1. University of Western Australia Press. 226 Pages. English.
The first part of Allen Lowries book series deals with the Australian tuberous Drosera. He dedicated four pages to each species with a brief description, drawing, distribution map and photos. Unfortunately, it is almost impossible to buy. Sometimes it is offered on Ebay at extremely high prices ...


Lowrie, Allen (1989): Carnivorous Plants of Australia, Volume 2. University of Western Australia Press. 240 Pages. English.
The second part deals with the Australian pygmy sundew species as well as three tuberous Drosera, D. glanduligera and D. hamiltonii. The structure is the same as in the first part. Unfortunately, this book is also sold out and almost no longer available.


Lowrie, Allen (1998): Carnivorous Plants of Australia, Volume 3. University of Western Australia Press. 288 Pages. English.
The last book by Allen Lowrie for the time being deals with all Australian carnivorous plants that were not dealt with in the previous books, such as Utricularia, some Drosera, Cephalotus, Nepenthes etc. With a little luck you can still buy this book from various online shops.


Lowrie, Allen (2014): Carnivorous Plants of Australia - Magnum Opus Volume 1. Redfern Natural History Productions. 458 Pages. English.
An updated edition of Allen Lowrie's book series on carnivorous plants in Australia. Volume 1 contains information on locations, identification keys etc., as well as descriptions of Aldrovanda, Byblis, Cephalotus and Drosera species (A to F).


Lowrie, Allen (2014): Carnivorous Plants of Australia - Magnum Opus Volume 2. Redfern Natural History Productions. 442 Pages. English.
Volume 2 continues with descriptions of the missing Drosera species from G to Z. As in the other volumes, there are also some new descriptions and many photos + illustrations of the individual species.


Lowrie, Allen (2014): Carnivorous Plants of Australia - Magnum Opus Volume 3. Redfern Natural History Productions. 455 Pages. English.
Volume 3 deals with the remaining carnivorous genera such as Nepenthes and Utricularia. These include, above all, many photos of Utricularia species that are otherwise very rarely seen. Utricularia fans will get their money's worth here.


McPherson, Stewart (2010): Carnivorous Plants and their Habitats, Volume One. Redfern Natural History Productions. 724 Pages. English.
The first part deals with the history, evolution and the different habitats of carnivorous plants. Afterwards snap traps (Dionaea and Aldrovanda) and pitfall traps (Darlingtonia, Heliamphora, Sarracenia, Nepenthes, Cephalotus, Brocchinia and Catopsis) are described in great detail. The photos are of high quality and show the plants in their natural habitat.


McPherson, Stewart (2010): Carnivorous Plants and their Habitats, Volume Two. Redfern Natural History Productions. 718 Pages. English.
The second book ties in directly with the first part and deals with the missing genera of the versatile flypaper traps (Drosera, Pinguicula, Byblis, Philcoxia! Etc.), Genlisea and of course also Utricularia. The plants are again presented in great detail and shown in their habitat (great pictures!). In the last chapter the future of these habitats of carnivorous plants is critically examined.


McPherson, Stewart; Schnell, Donald (2012): Field Guide to the Carnivorous Plants of the United States and Canada. Redfern Natural History Productions. 200 Pages. English.
This field guide gives a good overview of the carnivorous plants that occur in the USA and Canada (Catopsis, Aldrovanda, Dionaea, Darlingtonia and species of the genera Drosera, Pinguicula, Sarracenia and Utricularia). Some pages and beautiful photos (e.g. of the natural site) were dedicated to each species.


McPherson, Stewart; Robinson, Alastair (2012): Field Guide to the Pitcher Plants of Australia and New Guinea. Redfern Natural History Productions. 80 Pages. English.
This small booklet contains summary descriptions, drawings, many photos and distribution maps of Cephalotus follicularis and Nepenthes, which occur in Australia and New Guinea. It is especially suitable for those who want to visit the locations of these plants.


McPherson, Stewart; Robinson, Alastair (2012): Field Guide to the Pitcher Plants of Borneo. Redfern Natural History Productions. 98 Pages. English.
This booklet is somewhat more extensive than the other Nepenthes Field Guides. It includes all known Nepenthes species that occur on Borneo. These are briefly described again and covered with many beautiful pictures.


McPherson, Stewart; Robinson, Alastair (2012): Field Guide to the Pitcher Plants of Peninsular Malaysia and Indochina. Redfern Natural History Productions. 90 Pages. English.
This Nepenthes Field Guide also describes all of the Nepenthes species that occur in Malaysia and Indochina. There are also many pictures of the individual species and a general map.


McPherson, Stewart; Amoroso, Victor B. (2011): Field Guide to the Pitcher Plants of the Philippines. Redfern Natural History Productions. 60 Pages. English.
This booklet also contains a map of the area in question as well as many beautiful photos and brief descriptions of the Nepenthes species found on the Philippines.


McPherson, Stewart; Robinson, Alastair (2012): Field Guide to the Pitcher Plants of Sulawesi. Redfern Natural History Productions. 48 Pages. English.
The small field guide of the Nepenthes of Sulawesi contains many photos and small descriptions of the types of Nepenthes that occur in this part of Indonesia. This issue also has a map of the area in question.


McPherson, Stewart; Ronbinson, Alastair (2012): Field Guide to the Pitcher Plants of Sumatra and Java. Redfern Natural History Productions. 100 Pages. English.
The booklet, like the Nepenthes Fuild Guide from Borneo, is somewhat more extensive, since there are many species in Sumatra and Java. As with every guide, it includes a map, descriptions and many photos of each individual species.


McPherson, Stewart (2008): Glistening Carnivores - The Sticky-Leaved Insect Eating Plants. Redfern Natural History Productions. 392 Pages. English.
This book is all about all carnivorous plant species with sticky traps. Among other things, the genera Drosera, Pinguicula, Drosophyllum and Byblis described in more detail. The chapter on Triphyophyllum is also interesting, since this genus is usually less well known. All genera are treated in detail and there are many pictures of several species at the natural site as well as interesting photos of accompanying bugs.


McPherson, Stewart (2008): Lost Worlds of the Guiana Highlands. Redfern Natural History Productions. 388 Pages. English.
This book is about the Guyana highlands and the Table Mountains / Tepuis in South America. The development and history of this landscape is described. In addition to many beautiful pictures of the tepuis, the book also contains chapters on the fauna and flora resident there (e.g. carnivorous plants). The iridescent plants are also particularly interesting.


McPherson, Stewart (2011): New Nepenthes, Volume One. Redfern Natural History Productions. 596 Pages. English.
This book is all about new Nepenthes. Every Nepenthes species, that has been discovered recently and described, are described in this book. The chapters are sorted by location and always include small stories about the discovery etc. The photos are, as always, very beautiful.


McPherson, Stewart (2009): Pitcher Plants of the Old World, Volume One. Redfern Natural History Productions. 631 Pages. English.
The first book deals with Nepenthes and Cephalotus in general. Furthermore, the trapping mechanism is described in more detail as well as various animals that make use of the traps. Then the Nepenthes of Borneo, Malaysia and Indochina are described.


McPherson, Stewart (2009): Pitcher Plants of the Old World, Volume Two. Redfern Natural History Productions. 768 Pages. English.
Book two continues exactly where the first part breaks off. Nepenthessfrom various locations are described (Philippines, Sumatra and Java, Sulawesi, New Guinea etc.) and finally some hybrids. There is also a chapter in this book that is entirely dedicated to the Albany pitcher plant. Just like in part 1, the pictures are of high quality.


McPherson, Stewart; Wistuba, Andreas; Fleischmann, Andreas; Nerz, Joachim (2011): Sarraceniaceae of South America. Redfern Natural History Productions. 562 Pages. English.
This book is completely dedicated to the genus Heliamphora. All known species are described. Furthermore, the book contains chapters on the distribution area, history, habitats and much more. In addition to some drawings, the book again contains a lot of beautiful photos and maps of the Guiana highlands with their many tepuis.


Saito, Kei (2009): Domesday Book of Cultivated Bladderworts. Verlag?. 28 Pages. Japanese.
In this booklet, Utricularia species are mentioned that are or have been in cultivation. Since I unfortunately do not speak Japanese, I can only say that there are beautiful photos of almost every cultivated species in this booklet.


Salmon, Bruce (2001): Carnivorous Plants of New Zealand. Ecosphere Publications. 303 Pages. English.
This book describes the carnivorous plant species found in New Zealand. Furthermore, the book contains many beautiful photos and good drawings for each species, as well as short cultivation descriptions, habitats, etc.


Slack, Adrian (1985): Karnivoren - Biologie und Kultur der insektenfangenden Pflanzen. Verlag Eugen Ulmer. 267 Pages. German.
This book also deals in general with the different carnivorous plant genera. There are also some growing tips. The book includes black and white and some color photos. For a long time it was one of the standard works for carnivorous plants. Right now it is no longer completely up to date, but is still a recommended carnivorous plant book.


Stehli, Georg (1934): Pflanzen auf Insektenfang. Kosmos, Gesellschaft der Naturfreunde Franckh’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung Stuttgart. 79 Pages. German.
A very, very old carnivorous plant book in old German script with nice drawings and some black and white pictures. This book contains informations on various carnivorous plant species and is therefore very interesting for collectors.


Studnička, Miloslav (2006): Masožravé rostliny - objekt badatelů dobrodruhů a snìlků. Academia, Praha. 332 Pages. Czech.
Another general carnivorous plant book from the Czech Republic. Several species are described in more detail in this book. In addition, the book contains many pictures of different species in cultivation and in natural habitat. The Utricularia section is particularly extensive with almost 50 pages and thus many species.


Studnička, Miloslav; Franta, Jan; Spousta, Martin (2010): Masožravé rostliny, a jejich bydliště - Carnivorous Plants and their biotopes. Botanical Garden Liberec. 184 Pages. Czech, English.
This illustrated book shows various carnivorous plants of the various genera in their natural habitat. Beside each photo there is also a short description each species. The book also contains images of some rare species such as U. regia and U. reticulata.


Taylor, Peter (1989): The Genus Utricularia - A Taxonomic Monograph. Kew Bulletin Additional Series XIV. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. 736 Pages. English.
This book is the Utricularia book and a must have for every fan of this genus. In addition to various identification keys, this book primarily contains detailed species descriptions and biological drawings for 214 Utricularia species. Even if it is a few years old, it is still very up to date (even if a few species have been added in the meantime and a few sections have been slightly corrected). However, photos and growing descriptions are not found in this book. It is suitable for identification purposes and as a reference.


Scientific papers

Fleischmann, A., Rivadavia, F. (2009): Utricularia rostrata (Lentibulariaceae), a new species from the Chapada Diamantina, Brazil. Kew Bulletin 64, 155-159.


Fritsch, P.W., Almeda, F., Martins, A.B., Cruz, B.C., Estes, D. (2007): Rediscovery and phylogenetic placement of Philcoxia minensis (Plantaginaceae), with a test of carnivory. PCAS 58, 447-467.


Gassin, R. (1993): Utricularia beaugleholei (Lentibulariaceae: subgenus Utricularia: section Pleiochasia), a new species from south-eastern Australia. Muelleria 8, 37-42.


Gonella, P. M., Beeiro, P. C. (2018): Utricularia biceps (Lentibulariaceae), a new carnivorous species endemic to the campos rupestres of Brazil. Phytotaxa 376(5), 214-222.


Hu, G.W., Long, C.L., Liu, K.M. (2007): Utricularia mangshanensis (Lentibulariaceae), a new species from Hunan, China. Annales Botanici Fennici 44, 389-392.


Janarthanam, M. K., Henry, A. N. (1990): A new Utricularia L. (Lentibulariaceae) from peninsular India. Journal of the Bombay Natural History Society 87(3), 441-442.


Jobson, R. W. (2012): A new species of Utricularia (Lentibulariaceae) from northern Queensland, Australia. Telopea 14, 49-57.


Kameyama, Y., Toyama, M., Ohara, M. (2005): Hybrid origin and F1 dominance in the free-floating, sterile bladderwort, Utricularia australis f. australis (Lentibulariaceae). American Journal of Botany 92, 469-476.


Lowrie, A. (1998): A new species of Utricularia (Lentibulariaceae) from the south-west of Western Australia. Nuytsia 12, 37-41.


Lowrie, A. (1999): A taxonomic review of the yellow-flowered tuberous species of Drosera (Droseraceae) from south-west Western Australia. Nuytsia 13 (1), 75-87.


Lowrie, A. (2002): Utricularia petertaylorii (Lentibulariaceae), a new species from the south-west of Western Australia. Nuytsia 14, 405-410.


Lowrie, A. (2005): A taxonomic revision of Drosera section Stolonifera (Droseraceae), from south-west Western Australia. Nuytsia 15 (3), 355-393.


Lowrie, A., Cowie, I.D., Conran, J.G. (2008): A new species and section of Utricularia (Lentibulariaceae) from northern Australia. Telopea 12, 31-46.


Müller, K. F., Borsch, T., Legendre, L., Porembski, S., Barthlott, W. (2006): Recent Progress in Understanding the Evolution of Carnivorous Lentibulariaceae (Lamiales). Plant Biol. 8, 748-757.


Suksathan, P., Parnell, J.A.N. (2010): Three new species and two new records of Utricularia L. (Lentibulariaceae) from Northern Thailand. Thai Forrest Bulletin (Botany) 38, 23-32.


Taylor, P., Souza, V.C., Giulietti, A.M., and Harley, R.M. (2000): Philcoxia: a new genus of Scrophulariaceae with three new species from Eastern Brazil. Kew Bulletin 55, 155-163.


Yadav, S.R., Sardesai, M.M., Gaikwad, S.P. (2005): A New Species of Utricularia L. (Lentibulariaceae) from the Western Ghats, India. Rheedea 15, 71-73.


Zamudio, S., Olvera, M. (2009): A new species of Utricularia (Lentibulariaceae) from Guerrero, Mexico. Brittonia 61, 119-125.




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